Book Review: Good Omens

Title: Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch

Author: Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Published: 1990

BLURB

According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (the world’s only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655, before she exploded), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just before dinner.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon–both of whom have lived amongst Earth’s mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle–are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture.

And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist . . .

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

THE REVIEW

Good Omens is one of those books where claims of a cult following is not an exaggeration. Even my own immediate family is affected. My aunt worships this book. If books were gods, Good Omens would have an altar in her backyard. A big one.

This book is a collaboration between two bestselling authors, Neil Gaiman, and Terry Pratchett, both with their own passionate and loyal fanbase. Of course, this particular book was written thirty years ago. Long before Terry Pratchett became Sir Terry Prathcett and Neil Gaiman reached such a cult status that he’s guest-starred in everything from The Big Bang Theory to the Simpsons.

It’s a book that’s, once again, in the spotlight since a miniseries based on the book will Premier on Amazon Prime on May 31tst (2019). Sadly, Terry Pratchett passed away in 2015, but his co-author Neil Gaiman has been highly involved in bringing this story to the small screen.

If you, by chance, are stumbling into this review after the premiere of the series and you have no previous knowledge of Neil Gaiman and/or Terry Pratchett, I write about works of theirs HERE and HERE.

In Good Omens, you enter a world where Heaven and Hell have been preparing for their final showdown since the beginning of time. Except now, with the birth of the Antichrist, the end times are coming. In like a week.

This is particularly troublesome for Crowley, a Demon and his best friend Aziraphale, an Angel. Unlike their fellow Angels and Demons, these two have been on earth since The Beginning. As the apocalypse goes from an abstract goal to reality, these two unlikely friends realize they’re not too fond of the idea. They like earth. It’s filled with great things like books, Bentleys, and Queen. Who doesn’t like Queen?

A fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer can revisit Spike’s “I like the world” speech from the season 2 finale, and you’ll have a good idea of what’s happening here. On a similar note, fans of the show, Supernatural will feel right at home. Granted, Supernatural, for the most part, takes itself more seriously than Good Omens does, but the political realities of Heaven and Hell are quite similar.

What happens next includes prophecies by a slightly unhinged, seventeen-century witch, self-proclaimed witch hunters, the Four Horsemen (on motorcycles), Angels being bureaucratic assholes, and demons who overreact when you’ve accidentally misplaced the Antichrist. There are also Satanic nuns, patriotic Americans, and Hellhounds.

Oh, and the Antichrist is an eleven-year-old boy.

Hopefully, by now, people who are not fond of religious satire have figured out that this isn’t a book for them.

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

Good Omens is a comedy, with a very British sense of humor.

If you are familiar with Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman though their individual work, this book feels more like Pratchett than Gaiman. During interviews, both authors have stated that the original idea was Gaiman’s, but that Pratchett wrote more words and composed the final draft. Personally, I feel that’s noticeable in the text.

Both authors took charge in writing certain characters but then switched. There’s a little of them both in all the characters. However, if you’re familiar with their work you can, for the most part, tell which author created which character.

Although, the thing with the maggots could only be Neil Gaiman.

Despite the emphasis on Crowley and Aziraphale in the blurb, this book follows several characters, many with their own points-of-view, some more prominent than others. These include Newton Pulsifer, newly recruited witch-finder. Anathema Device, multi-great granddaughter of Agnes Nutter, Witch. Madam Tracy, a medium, and of course, the Antichrist.

Crowley and Aziraphale are my favorites. Nothing beats a bookish Angel holding on for dear life in a speeding Bentley while the Demon driving blasts Queen at maximum volume. I wish we could have spent more time with the supernatural duo.

To be honest, I was oversold on this book. Unfortunately, during all those enthusiastic recommendations, people around me failed to mention that Crowley and Aziraphale were two characters among many others. If you decide to read this novel, you need to know there are big chunks of this book where they are not the narrative focus.

That being said, all side-characters are well-rounded. There are many entertaining plotlines that all steer in one direction and come together in a satisfying way. No side-plot feels out of place or unnecessary, no side-character unimportant.

It’s unavoidable that you, as a reader, will have favorites. Just because I favor Crowley and Aziraphale doesn’t mean the others aren’t likable or interesting, I just have a thing for sassy demons.

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

One thing that’s often said about this book is that it belongs on the big (or small) screen. I agree. It’s a visual story with scenes that, while reading, you want to see with your own eyes. Not because the writing makes it difficult to picture what is happening, but because you know it would be hilarious. I’m really looking forward to the miniseries. I think this is a story that will work great on tv, and the trailer looks fantastic.

So, is it a good book? Short answer, yes. It’s entertaining. The plot is clever, the central conflict funny, and the characters charming.

That being said, the antagonists are basic without internal motivation. They’re just bad. But that’s the point. This is satire. Good Omens relies on a specific type of humor that will not appeal to everyone.

If British humor, satire, sarcasm, absurd events, and outrageous characters aren’t your preference, you will not like it. But, if you find yourself singing along to the end credits of Monty Python’s, Life of Brian this perfect. You’ll love it.

Personally, I feel ambivalent towards it. As I said, I’ve been oversold on this book.

I’ve been trying to put my finger on what it is about Good Omens that leaves me feeling unsatisfied. I should love it. Broken down into individual parts, it ticks all my boxes. Funny, sarcasm, religious satire, sassy demons, check, check, check, and check. I should be riding the cult train by now. I’m not.

I think it all boils down to the fact that I love both Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman as individual authors.

I love Terry Pratchett for his quirkiness, his wordplay, satire, sarcasm, and humanity. I love his Discworld. If I could move to any fantasy world, I would move there.

I love Neil Gaiman for his atmospheric world-building and his intriguing characters. I love his weirdness and originality.

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

I like Good Omens, but I don’t love it. It’s not enough Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman, it’s something in-between.

These two authors are so different. Neil Gaiman is not funny. Terry Pratchett’s world-building is lovely, but it’s not atmospheric.

Pratchett has a language that you want to dissect just so you can get the joke. Gaiman’s voice makes you want to light candles, wrap yourself in black velvet, and stylishly sip your dainty glass of Absinthe.

These two styles don’t mix well. Good Omens works because the idea is good, and these are two talented authors. But, it is a book where their individual voices have been scaled back to make it cohesive.

This is how I feel. There are plenty of Gaiman and Pratchett fans who think this collaboration is the most fantastic thing ever. So, don’t give my opinion too much weight. Just keep in mind that if you pick up this book, it’s not a Terry Pratchett or a Nail Gaiman novel, it’s something else.

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

EDITIONS & NARRATION

This book is a thirty-year-old cult classic, so there are countless editions. It’s impossible for me to try to list or recommend editions, especially now when the promotion for the miniseries is in full swing. You can find copies pretty much anywhere.

If you, like me, are collecting the Discworld Collectors Library books, I would suggest THIS edition of Good Omens. The cover is glossier, but it fits in well with the other books in size and style.

If you’re looking for unique, Limited Editions, Discworldemporium.com or Discworld.com this is the place to go. Both specialize in Terry Pratchett books and merchandise.

As for the audiobook, pay attention as there are different versions. There are both narrated and dramatized versions. I hear the BBC Radio 4 dramatization is excellent.

However, there is a significant difference between the two versions. The dramatized one is around four hours long, while the narrated one is over twelve hours.

If you choose the BBC Radio 4 one, you’re essentially buying a radio drama, not a book.

The version I listened to was narrated by Martin Jarvis. I enjoyed his narration, and the quality of the recording was good.

Good Omens, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Queen, Bentley, Crowley, Aziraphale, Angels, Demons, Devil, Gabriel, Antichrist, Nuns, Book, Amazon Prime, Medium, Witch, Witch-hunter, Atlantis, Giant Octopus, Raining Frogs, UFO, Death, The Four Horsemen

FINAL THOUGHTS

Good Omens is an entertaining book.

It’s a wonderful religious satire. If the thought of cute little nuns worshipping Satan and squeeing over baby Antichrist makes you giggle, this book will be just your thing.

However, if you are a fan of one or both authors, you need to understand that it won’t be “their” book. Both have scaled back on their individuality, originality, and personal style to tell this story.

That doesn’t mean it isn’t fun. The plot is entertaining, and most of the characters are well-written. Over-all it’s a clever idea. It’s a visually exciting story with a fantastic Queen soundtrack.

But, don’t make the same mistake as I did. Don’t go into this book with expectations.  There is a Death in this story, but it’s not Terry Pratchett’s, DEATH nor is it Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, Death.

This book is what happens when two talented, but entirely different authors write a book together. It’s well-written and entertaining. But, it is a compromise.

My Rating: 7/10

How I rate:
1 = My god, how did this shit get published?!
2 = No, really, how?
3 = Meh, I didn’t have anything better to do, so I finished it.
4 = It was decent.
5 = It wasn’t a memorable read, but I probably enjoyed it.
6 = I had a good time, I’ll check out the author.
7 = This was great; this book has earned the right to live in my bookcase.
8 = I’m going to read every single book this author has ever written.
9 = This was fantastic. Point the way to the collector’s edition/ companion/merchandise!
10 = I will eject a shrine and read this book over and over until the day I die.

Unless credited, all images displayed on this blog are either mine or Copy Right Free and released under Creative Commons CCO. They are available for free at one of or more of the following places: Max Pixel, Flickr, Public Domain Archive, Pixabay or Gratisography.


2 thoughts on “Book Review: Good Omens

  1. Nice review! I actually loved this book. I hadn’t read any Terry Pratchett and only a little Neil Gaiman beforehand, so I went into it with and open mind. Perhaps that was beneficial for my assessment of the book..

    Like

    1. Thank you. I went into this book with unrealistic expectations. I’m sure, had I approached it without preconcived ideas, I would have loved it too. Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment.

      Like

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